Posted by: nancykenny | May 8, 2010

Still Think You’re Funny?

It seems like ages now that I was at the Big Comedy Go-To in London (ON). I’ve been wanting to write a wrap up of the event but I dove right into a school tour with A Company of Fools (which just ended today and is the topic of another blog post) and simply did not have the time.

If you want to catch up, you can read all about my first day at the festival here.

That Saturday I slept in for the first time in what felt like ages (even more so now that I’ve been getting up at 5:30-6 am because of the school shows). Something like 10 or 11. It was bliss. The friend I was staying with had left to go teach an improv class, so I went through my morning routine, grabbed some coffee he was kind enough to have made before heading out, wrote my blog post, and went out for some food.

At 4 pm, I was the first one in line for a panel discussion with many of the performers on what it’s like to do what they do. I was so ahead of the pack that I actually helped with the chair set up.

I really enjoyed the panel and I’m glad it’s become a regular occurrence at the festival. I don’t know how non-artistic people find it, but for me, it makes me feel like I’m not alone. It makes me realize that even the amazing, wonderful, talented people out there who do all this super cool and funny stuff have the same doubts and fears and small bank accounts I do. I had taken some really great notes of this discussion, but unfortunately since my phone was stolen (I’ve now had it returned, minus the SIM card and everything saved on it), I’ve lost everything I had jotted down.

Sigh.

Just know that I found it all very inspiring. And I still adore Paul Hutcheson.

I then had dinner with Uncalled For and friends before attending their production of This Is All Your Birthdays. As I said in my last Go-To blog post, I had seen this show previously at the Ottawa Fringe Festival, where it had (justifiably so) won the award for Best Ensemble. When I saw it, there were four guys performing it. This time there were three. And some scenes had changed. It was well worth seeing again. These guys can do no wrong.

That was followed up by some cool sketch comedy from many people I had never met before and then some Improv with Sex T-Rex, Fully Insured, and more Uncalled For.

And then, the big one: The Improv Cage Match hosted by Mikaela Dyke (who I only realized later was in Reflections on Giving Birth to a Squid, which I saw in Winnipeg at the Fringe and is the one who I reviewed with “very strong acting from the lead actress whose name I have unfortunately forgotten” – Glad to know I’ve now corrected that oversight). The Cage Match (which unfortunately was falsely advertised as I never saw a cage) took almost every performer from the evening, threw them into groups that had never worked together before, and had them compete improv style for the publics affection or elimination. The winning team would walk away with 2 pounds of gummy bears. Oh and honour or something, but really we just all wanted the gummy bears. Yes, I did say “we”. Mikeala asked me earlier in the day if I would participate. Since I am crazy, I said yes.

How it all worked: 4 teams all do some short form. At the end, the public votes for the best teams. Top 1 & 2 move ahead. Teams 3 and 4 then compete and the audience decides who stays. I got put into a great group, but our improvs definitely weren’t the strongest. We’d always end up in an elimination round, but somehow, thanks to some strong people, we’d end up on top.

We got second place! And gummy bears were shared all around.

I had to leave super early the next day (or more accurately, later that morning) since I had rehearsal in Ottawa in the afternoon. That said, the opportunity to reconnect with old friends, the new friends I’ve made (including a performer I will be potentially billeting throughout the Ottawa Fringe), the new skills I’ve discovered I have as a performer, and, of course, the great shows and the passion that goes into creating this festival makes it something that I will probably be supporting for the years to come. You should too.

Oh and if the festival organizer is reading this: next year, more Elvis please!


Responses

  1. Sounds like a blast. It’s strange how more and more people in the arts are realizing they are more and more like everyone else in the arts. Wouldn’t it be nice to have an arts council here in Ottawa that figured its job was to promote these intersections.

  2. It’s hard. We get so bogged down in our own niches and schedules. We’re so worried about competition taking potential audience members away from us. We forget that what we are really doing is advertising a medium as a whole, not just a single venture.

    We need to think bigger.

  3. Yer right about that……but how?


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